Immigrant Cost in Norway

In the fall of 2015, the Norwegian parliament decided almost unanimously that the politicians and the population ought to have some figures concerning the cost of immigration from non-Western countries. The results have just been published.

From the age of 25 and to the date of his death, a male immigrant from what the Norwegian government calls “Group 3” – that is, Asia and Africa – will cost Norway 6.2 million Norwegian crowns, which is the equivalent of 740,000 US dollars.

From the age of 25 and to the date of her death, a female immigrant from Asia or Africa will cost Norway 11.6 million Norwegian crowns, which is the equivalent of 1.4 million US dollars.

The Norwegian report details several prospects for what non-Western immigration will cost Norway in the coming years.

In the medium-level scenario non-Western immigration to Norway will cost the Norwegian society 104 billion Norwegian crowns, which is the equivalent of 12.4 billion US dollars. That might not sound like a lot by a US yardstick, but Norway is a small country of only 5 million people.

Another way to say it is that, from the year 2035 and till 2100, all growth in wages and productivity for Norwegian citizens will be lost, as it will have to be taxed away to pay for non-Western immigration to Norway.

That is, if non-Western immigration to Norway is allowed to continue, the country is looking at 65 years of no improvement in the lot of ordinary citizens. And that’s only the economic side of the matter. That’s not factoring in the increased crime rate brought about by non-Western immigrants.

One final point is that the statistical methods used in the report are rather conservative and take an extremely cautious approach. For example, they assume that the second-generation descendants will be fully integrated into Norwegian society, even though the data actually shows that second-generation descendants are more troublesome than their first-generation parents. That is to say, it is far more likely that that the report is underestimating the true cost of immigration than overestimating it.

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